Partch’s Bastards

An alternative world of sounds

Partch's Bastards

In this innovative concert we explore the work and legacy of idiosyncratic American composer Harry Partch (1901-74) with a day long exhibition of musical sculptures and new instruments and a night-time concert. Partch has no obvious musical heir, but his legacy has been widely distributed and appears in part in the work of many, hence the concert title. Other works feature Australian and world premieres by composers Juan Felipe Waller, Christiaan van der Vyver, William Brooks and Amanda Cole.

Program

Matthew Hoare — automated instruments – exhibition & performance (2003)

Harry Partch — Barstow, adapted guitar (1941 Australian premiere)


Juan Felipe Waller — Teguala, for 60 ceramic tiles (2000 Australian premiere)

Harry Partch — Two Studies in Ancient Greek Scales, dulcimer & cello (1950 Australian Premiere)

Christiaan van der Vyver — Light Floats Down Day River, flute, cello, just-intonation xenophone, Balinese gongs & tape (2003 world premiere)

William Brooks — Whitegold Blue, solo flute (1967 Australian premiere)

Amanda Cole — Cirrus, just-tuned wine-glasses (2003 world premiere)

Lou Harrison — Canticle No.3, ocarina, guitar & 5 percussionists (1942)

Greg Schiemer — electronic music, electronics (2003)

Performers

Julia Ryder (cello)
Kathleen Gallagher (flute)
Christiaan van der Vyver (guitar)
Jackie Luke (dulcimer)
Bree van Reyk, Jeremy Barnett, Kim Moyes, John Dewhurst (percussion)

Past Performances

Sydney 
Paddington Uniting Church, 8pm Saturday 3rd May, 2003

Media & Acclaim

“The concert lived up to its subtitle, ‘An alternative world of sounds’, and although the tonalities of Partch and his bastards sound for the most part more familiar than they did half a century ago — so broad has our collective musical experience become – there was still much to challenge the well-tuned ear.” Full review here

RealTime Arts

“It was more performance art than music, in a concert which was more art exhibition than classical recital: the performances could be better described as ‘real time’ exhibits among the ‘static’ exhibits of automated instruments, built by Matthew Hoare and ranged around the hall. All in all, it was another intelligent and intriguing show from a group which is committed to asking ‘what if?'” Full review here

Sydney Morning Herald